Posts Tagged ‘TLAER’

Thinking ahead and getting money

February 11, 2014

While the Eastern half of the country prepares for another round of winter (and we note that the Nashville area, yet again, gets a cold blast, but still has NO SNOW… just bare brown ground- grrrr), WE can be working on emergency/disaster preparedness.

Honestly, I’m not a doomsday prepper. I’ve just been through, or watched friends and family go through, enough disasters to realize the benefits of preparation.

There are courses on emergency prep through Coursera (Disaster Preparation, through the University of Pittsburgh: https://www.coursera.org/course/disasterprep)

More information through FEMA: http://www.fema.gov/

Independent study courses through FEMA: http://training.fema.gov/IS/NIMS.aspx

More and specialized courses through your local/state Emergency Management Agency – for example, how to read a map/GPS; basics of Search & Rescue; information on how to join or put together a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) or a Community Animal Response Team (CART).

One of my favorites, and this should be REQUIRED for ALL emergency personnel: Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue (http://tlaer.org/ or their facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/tlaer/)

Some states, like Ohio have new regulations:

http://www.emergencymgmt.com/disaster/Dangerous-Wild-Animal-Response-Team-Ohio.html

And there are new grants available:

ASPCA has a small bridge loan for emergency program-related expenses of $50,000-$250,000: http://www.aspcapro.org/grant/2013/12/11/program-related-investments-emergencies-and-disasters

ASPCA also has an Emergency and Disaster Response Grant of up to $50,000: http://www.aspcapro.org/node/512

So while most are pouring over seed catalogs, I’ll be working on updating my information, making sure my equipment is clean and working (or consider investing in new equipment), seeing where I can help my local EMA.

Oh… and I’m looking at seed catalogs too 🙂

Grants available-

January 16, 2014

I want to thank my friends Sarah Barnett, at the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), and Rebecca Gimenez, owner and head teacher of Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue (TLAER), for this pretty darned extensive list of grants:

FOR THOSE LOOKING FOR GRANTS – Don’t say that we don’t try to help you make it happen… LOL! here are a few that you might want to check out… updated as of 9/2013.

1) The ASPCA Equine Fund provides grants to non-profit, equine welfare organizations in the United States for efforts related to horse protection. Grant info is available at: http://www.aspcapro.org/grant/2013/02/11/grants-aspca-equine-fund

2) ASPCA Emergency Hay Support Grants are available for 501c(3) rescues that have been hit hard by rising hay prices. In 2008, ASPCA equine-related grants totaled more than $500,000 and were distributed in 40 states. To apply, go to http://www.aspcapro.org/grant/2013/02/13/emergency-and-disaster-response-grants.

3) The Build-A-Bear Workshop Bear Hugs Foundation provides support for animals in domestic pet programs including animal welfare foundations, pet rescue and rehabilitation organizations, therapeutic and humane education pet programs. For more information, a pdf document is available at http://www.cybergrants.com/pls/cybergrants/ao_login.login?x_gm_id=2727&x_proposal_type_id=9874

4) The Brennan Equine Welfare Fund assists equine rescue shelters across the country that provide dignity to aged, injured, abused, starved and slaughter-bound horses, as well as those used in medical experimentation. This fund supports registered, 501(c) (3) organizations that specialize in retirement and rehabilitation services and offer a peaceful and permanent sanctuary for horses. Shelters which offer carefully scrutinized adoption and replacement services are also supported. To apply, go to http://www.brennanequinewelfarefund.com and click on “Grant Proposals.” For additional information contact Linda Pavey at (513) 561-5251 or brennanequinewelfarefund@yahoo.com.

5) The Equus Foundation raises public awareness in the value of horses through education and awards of grants to charities that illustrate the benefit of horses, promote equine welfare, and elevate equestrian sports. Visit http://www.equusfoundation.org

6) The Foundation Center http://foundationcenter.org is an excellent source of information for various kinds of potential funders. They offer an extensive database on U.S .grant makers as well as training programs (some are free while others are fee-based) covering all aspects of fundraising. They also publish a guide for foundations interested in funding environment- and animal welfare-related organizations. Locations are available in libraries across the country.

7) The Petco Foundation Grant was established in 1999 and since then, has raised and distributed more than $34 million through fundraisers and donations. To be eligible, local organizations must enlist the support of their local Petco store. For more information, go to http://www.petco.com/petco_Page_PC_petcofoundationhome.aspx or call 626-287-0952.

8) PetSmart Charities awards grants to 501c(3) animal welfare organizations. For more information on grant applications and guidelines, go to http://www.petsmartcharities.org/grants/.

9) Horse Aid Live is a 501(C)3 organization that will carry out its mission by granting financial support to other 501(C)3 organizations that retrain, rehabilitate, retire, or shelter unwanted, homeless horses of ALL breeds ~ the United Way for horses. http://www.horseaidlive.org/images/GrantApplication2013HAL.pdf

10) AAEP Foundation accepts equine specific funding requests that are dedicated to the health and welfare of the horse. Funds are awarded to those requests that have the most impact on a national and/or international level. http://www.aaep.org/foundation_funding_grants.htm

11) Equine Protection Fund The Trail’s End program subsidizes some veterinary fees and disposal costs for humanely euthanizing suffering horses and other equines. To qualify, low-income horse owners must have verification from a licensed veterinarian. Emergency feed assistance is available to horse owners who have incurred temporary financial difficulty (job loss, medical emergency, foreclosure, etc.) within the past 6 months. The also provide assistance for gelding. http://equineprotectionfund.org/programs.php

12) Heart of a Horse The Heart of a Horse Foundation will provide a grant for farms, fellow non-profits associated with horses (rescue, therapy, community outreach) and individual horse owners needing support and assistance obtaining medicine. Horses are being slaughtered and put down for reasons otherwise handled by proper treatment and medicine; this grant will help rectify these cases. http://www.heartofahorse.org/about/about-hoah/

Programs directed specifically to Thoroughbred rescues or sanctuaries

13) After the Finish Line provides funding assistance to rescue organizations devoted to caring for Thoroughbred ex-racehorses and broodmares. They provide both grants and emergency funds to qualified Thoroughbred rescue and retirement organizations located throughout the United States. For more information on this grant program, go to: http://www.afterthefinishline.org/.

14) Blue Horse Charities was formed in 2001 to assist organizations that provide Thoroughbred racehorse retraining and adoption, and the emphasis is to keep all Thoroughbreds out of the hands of “killer buyers.” For more information or to fill out a grant application, go to: http://www.bluehorsecharities.org.

15) The mission of Thoroughbred Charities of America (TCA) is to “provide a better life for Thoroughbreds, both during and after their racing careers, by supporting retirement, rescue and research and by helping the people who work with them.” This enables TCA to offer equine grants for Thoroughbred rescue, rehabilitation, retraining, adoption, retirement and euthanasia. For more information, visit: http://www.tca.org

16) CARMA is dedicated to the goal of providing funding for the rehabilitation, retraining and/or retirement of Thoroughbred horses that have raced in California. http://www.carma4horses.org/about/carma-grants

Colorado Flood information

September 15, 2013

Colorado Flood information

I watch, feeling fairly helpless, as friends are evacuated and forever changed by the current flooding in Colorado.  My training- and yes, I’m finally getting training for Disaster Preparedness and Large Animal Emergency Rescue- is not completed yet, not that it would help.  I’m not in a call up area.  I’ve learned so much from the courses I’ve taken so far- such as DO NOT DEPLOY to a disaster unless you’re called up.  The last thing the disaster needs are too many people wanting to help but not having anything to do. 

What I CAN do, is get information out.  For those of you wanting more information about the flooding, I’m including a link to the local Denver news Facebook Page. 

Heroic Oklahoma First Responders- By Michele De Vinney Schmoll, of Horse Evacuations East

July 11, 2013

Tornadoes are a horrible thing to go through, as a human… and for animals it can be even more frightening ~ Many animals were lost in the terrible EF-5 tornado that devastated rural Oklahoma, an area where horses and livestock were very common. The story, that Michele has written here, reminds me of the first few days after our EF-3 tornado in 2008, except that the Oklahoma situation was much, MUCH, worse.
Please, if you are involved with livestock, with horses, with animals in general, get involved with a some sort of legitimate animal first response team. TLAER (http://www.tlaer.org/) is a good place to get training ~ Horse Evacuations East is a great Facebook Group (https://www.facebook.com/HorseEvacuationsEast), and United States Equine Rescue League, another one of Michele’s organizations, is another great organization to get involved with (http://www.userl.org/). Here’s Michele’s story (note, to go on, click on the part II and then part III at the bottoms of the pages): http://www.nickernews.net/ok-first-responders.aspx#.Ud8OkFOGF5i